GUINEVERE DISCLAIMERS AND PRIVACY POLICY

GUINEVERE DISCLAIMERS AND PRIVACY POLICY

We value our relationship with our community and your privacy.  We have updated our Privacy Policy to increase transparency and comply with the European Union data protection law known as the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which went into effect on May 25, 2018. We ask you to read our policies in full and provide your consent:

  • we provide details about the types of data that we collect
  • the ways in which we use it
  • and the measures we take to keep your data safe.

Thank you for being part of the GUINEVERE project!

Click here to watch our Privacy Policy, Click here to opt in.

The GUINEVERE Team


Privacy on the Guinevere Virtual World

For the GUINEVERE Virtual World a personal account is needed. This account needs to be created on our web portal: http://world.guinevereproject.eu:8002/wifi/user/account/

During the sign up process we collect your first name, last name and password; the latter will be safely encrypted in our database. We never require you to provide your real name as a username and you are free to choose any name. Your email address is optional; this is not needed for creating the account. This is only used when a ‘forgot password’ request is sent by the user, through our web portal.

If you provide us with your email address and then later decide you’d like us to delete it from our records, just let us know by sending us an email at info at 3dles dot com, and we’d be happy to do so. We do not use your email to send future email or for any other purpose.

The account needs approval by the Virtual World manager before a user can log into the virtual world.

In the GUINEVERE Virtual World, we intend to collect information for educational research purposes only.

We log or collect:

  • The username, IP, User ID number, date and time when a user enters the virtual world.
  • The preferred language the user wants to use.
  • The birth year of the user.
  • What objects the user has clicked on, sat on or walked through, including date and time.
  • What games the user has played and what score the user reached, including date and time.
  • The conversation the user has done with other users or with chat bots, using text chat.
  • Observation of avatar interaction in the virtual world that may be video recorded.

At your first log in on our Guinevere Virtual World server, you will see a pop-up on your screen that will ask you to agree to the privacy terms mentioned above. If you do not agree, you will still have access to all islands but your personal data will not be collected. By accepting the terms you will provide consent to your participation in the educational research mentioned above.

You are free to withdraw from the study at any time. At every stage, your name will remain confidential. The data will be kept securely and will be used for research purposes only.

Our Commitment to Data Security

To prevent unauthorized access, maintain data accuracy, and ensure the correct use of information, we have put in place appropriate physical, electronic, and administrative procedures to safeguard and secure the information we collect online.

Disclaimers

Any support groups, peer supporters, forum, or support group networks mentioned or described by the GUINEVERE project on our website or within our virtual world and Minecraft are for educational and informational purposes only.

The GUINEVERE project does not endorse or recommend commercial or non-commercial products, services, processes or manufacturers. We assume no liability whatsoever for the use or contents of any product or service mentioned.

All product names, logos, and brands are property of their respective owners. All company, product and service names used in this website and virtual worlds are for identification purposes only. Use of these names, logos, and brands does not imply endorsement.

The GUINEVERE project is not responsible for the contents of any “off-site” Internet information referenced by or linked to the GUINEVERE project internet site.

 

EU FUNDED GUINEVERE PROJECT (2017-2019) This project has been funded with support from the European Commission (Project number:2017-1-UK01-KA201-036783). The information on this website reflects the views only of the authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

Abstract Chris McGuirk

THE CONNECTION OF SELVES: EXPLORING IDENTITY
DEVELOPMENT IN A TRANSNATIONAL ONLINE DISCOURSE
COMMUNITY
C.T. McGuirk
University of Central Lancashire (UNITED KINGDOM)
ctmcguirk@uclan.ac.uk

There has been considerable research to suggest that learners develop an alternate identity to interact more easily within an online space (Kim, Lee and Kang, 2012; Peachey and Childs, 2012;
Brown, 2011). In addition, it could be inferred from a number of the studies that an everexpanding, global, virtual discourse space may be helping learners to participate with reduced
anxiety and increased self-efficacy. However, questions remain surrounding how to categorise the identity learners create, which is arguably an identity fashioned purposely for online integration, and how a practitioner may harness this identity to improve the language learning experience for their students. In terms of the first question, there is scope to suggest that they are two global schools of thought. Perhaps more common is a realisation in line with Kramsch’s (2009) concept of the second language ‘virtual self’ – a facet of a learner’s perceived ideal ‘self’ (as explained by Dörnyei, 2005), activated when inside an online space, but always at the learner’s disposal, because it is simply one aspect of an holistic learner identity. The counter-argument to Kramsch’s (2009) paradigm, referred to as the ‘multilingual subject’, is the theory often mooted in gaming research (Yee, 2009; Peterson, 2006; Bessière, Seay and Kessler, 2007), that the identity development is a form of escapism. Put in the simplest of terms, students seem to see the ability to integrate under an assumed identity as a crucial affordance of joining a virtual space.
Both theories share similarities, but it may be necessary to highlight the key difference. Essentially, both Kramsch (2009) and the gaming theorists agree that a new persona is created.
However, the former’s portrayal of the identity as one element of a language learner’s ideal character implies that any interaction or learning taking place within the online space could be
harnessed in the traditional classroom. Yee (2009), certainly, would appear to be claiming the opposite, that the virtual and real world may be entirely distinct conceptions of reality.
This paper evaluates the validity of both the abovementioned paradigms, on the understanding that they both may have missed something in their assertions. This is informed partly by studies
on using technology (Greenhow and Robelia, 2009; Lee, Srinivasan, Trail, Lewis and Lopez, 2011) which appeared to conclude that students needed signposting to when learning online was
taking place, suggesting that the identity development may not be a conscious process. The paper looks at a relatively new concept – the distinction between the second language
connected self (L2C) and the second language offline self (L2O), as well as discussing the results of an initial qualitative study to ascertain student perceptions on virtual spaces. By exploring the
concept and its implications for students and practitioners, the author reasons that online identities may not be a facet of a learner self, but rather a compartmentalised reality that a learner can
simply activate or deactivate. Were this to be the case, then it is possible there may be a whole additional language learner, with different levels of language learning potential, with whom many
teachers may still have yet to engage.

Keywords: identity development, virtual worlds, discourse, transnational, engagement, self, L2
virtual self, multilingual subject

An introduction to Club Minecraft Mini Games

An introduction to Club Minecraft Mini Games
Date: 02 February 2018 
Time: 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm GMT
Recording of the session 

Speaker: Matthew Ward, Founder of Club Minecraft

We are happy to present our first Guinevere Project Webinar with Matthew Ward, founder of Club Minecraft. 
Club Minecraft hosts Minecraft LAN parties each month on Saturdays from 10am-4pm and is a great place for kids to meet and play with each other and learn from one another. Club Minecraft follows an open creative policy and allows kids to gain extensive modification and powerful control in game, along with a multi-world feature where players can choose from different worlds, and game types, to play in depending on what they want to do. Players are free to build, play, and explore in custom maps no player will ever see online. Featuring unique structures, tasks and mini-games built by the staff.

Puzzles – test your memory with our mazes
Creative – take part in one of our build challenges
Parkour – be challenged by jumping puzzles
Redstone – programmable tiles allow for myriad possibilities.

We are happy to present our first Guinevere Project Webinar with Matthew Ward, founder of Club Minecraft. 
Club Minecraft hosts Minecraft LAN parties each month on Saturdays from 10am-4pm and is a great place for kids to meet and play with each other and learn from one another. Club Minecraft follows an open creative policy and allows kids to gain extensive modification and powerful control in game, along with a multi-world feature where players can choose from different worlds, and game types, to play in depending on what they want to do. Players are free to build, play, and explore in custom maps no player will ever see online. Featuring unique structures, tasks and mini-games built by the staff.

Puzzles – test your memory with our mazes
Creative – take part in one of our build challenges
Parkour – be challenged by jumping puzzles
Redstone – programmable tiles allow for myriad possibilities.

TPACK with Machinima

Infusing Digital Literacies into World Language Teacher Education TPACK with Machinima
Date: 10 March 2018

Time: 2 pm – 2:40 pm GMT/UTC
Recording of the session

Speaker: Dr Alina Horlescu, Dublin City University Contact: alina.horlescu2@mail.dcu.ie

The webinar is organized by SIG Virtual worlds & Serious Games Eurocall/Calico in cooperation with the University of Lancashire on behalf of the Guinevere Project.

Content:

Studies indicate that many language teachers have a tendency to view language as an abstract linguistic system and are, therefore, hesitant to acknowledge new dimensions of literacy and that learning a language in the digital age involves new communicative competencies including the ability to construct knowledge collaboratively and create and interpret texts that combine various resources made available by digital technologies.

This presentation reports on a recently completed PhD study conducted to investigate the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) of language teachers engaged in the digital literacy practice of producing a multimodal ensemble with machinima with a view to proposing an updated TPACK model for integration of digital literacies into language teacher education. To this end, language teachers participated in a course specifically designed to train them to make machinima videos as well as prompt them to reflect on the affordances of the tool and their transformative effect on the concepts of language and literacy.

This presentation discusses the main findings of the study and introduces a reconceptualised TPACK model for integration of digital literacies into language teacher education. The model includes ecological perspectives on language and language learning and teaching and a metalanguage that would enable teachers to discuss and explain the creation of various mode relationships enabled by digital tools.

Using Minecraft in Storytelling

Webinar revisited
This webinar was held by Chris Bailey, Sheffield University, UK on behalf of the CAMELOT Project
13th March, 10.30 – 11.30 am GMT

To watch the recording follow this link

Abstract: Storying in and around a Minecraft Community

Recent work around the use of Virtual Worlds in educational contexts has conceptualised literacies as communal processes, whilst considering complex notions of collaboration through participants’ multiplicity of presence. Screen-based virtual worlds can also be viewed as multimodal texts, constructed by multiple players. Shaped by these ideas, this presentation draws upon data collected during an extra-curricular Minecraft club for ten and eleven year old children, exploring the ways in which the players take up the narrative opportunities offered by the game, as they collaborate to build a ‚virtual community‘.

With a focus on the literacy events and artefacts generated in and around a virtual space, this presentation describes how this established, self-directed group of children used this environment to compose and create improvised stories. It explores how the literacies constructed through their interactions were influenced by resources drawn from their wider experiences, shaped by their experiments with in-game multimodal creation. The children’s interactions enabled them to form their own individual and collective textual landscapes, through a set of emotionally charged manifestations of literacy, played out in the hybrid virtual/material worlds.

 
For Chris‘ PhD research material on Minecraft being used with a year 6 afterschool club see http://mrchrisjbailey.co.uk/ 

Biography

Chris Bailey is a PhD student at Sheffield Hallam University. His PhD study is titled: ‘Investigating the Lived Experience of a Virtual World After School Club‘. This research stems from his previous work as a primary school teacher, where he taught across the primary age ranges. His research explores the ways in which children make meaning in and around digital environments, with a particular interest in the informal learning opportunities offered by social, digitally mediated gaming. He runs the Children and Video Games multidisciplinary discussion group at Sheffield Hallam University and blogs regularly about his work